Cyanoacrylates & Anaerobics

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Cyanoacrylates are an acrylic resin that will rapidly polymerize in the presence of moisture. Known as instant adhesives (like Super Glue), they harden in seconds to bond rigid plastic, glass, metal, rubber and other low porosity materials. Cyanoacrylate adhesives work great for product assembly and are widely used in the automotive, medical, electronics and aerospace industries where fast curing and high tensile and sheer strengths are needed. When applied, cyanoacrylates will form long, strong chemical chains, joining the bonded surfaces together. A normal bond reaches full strength in two hours and is waterproof.

Anaerobics are an acrylic resin that will rapidly polymerize in the presence of air. This liquid adhesive is used to hold nuts and bolts firmly in place. Anaerobics come in various strengths based on the amount of torque resistance required to break the bond. These liquid adhesives are perfect for machinery that is under constant vibration or movement because they prevent against vibration loosening, while locking and sealing threaded assemblies and metal parts. They have excellent resistance to extremely harsh environments.

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"We were buying four different types of adhesives from four different companies and getting adhesive equipment from a fifth company. Our business is always changing and when we called with a problem only one company continually seemed to understand our sense of urgency and that company was HAR. Most importantly, our HAR Technical salesman seemed to always have the solution we needed. Today, from super glues to hot melt adhesives and adhesive equipment we look to HAR. By the way, we get the same positive support when we call the plant, even when we need an order expedited! Thank you!" - Plant Manager of a mid-sized foam fabricator

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